Posts Tagged ‘Michael Vick’

RGIII and Washington Redskins host Michael Vick and Philadelphia Eagles in Monday Night Football opener

September 9, 2013

ImageThe Philadelphia Eagles have gotten off to a 10-7 lead against the Washington Redskins at FedEx Field in Landover, Maryland.

The game marks the return of Robert Griffin III to the field after last January’s ACL tear in a playoff loss to Seattle. For Philadelphia, Chip Kelly is coaching in his first NFL game and Michael Vick is hoping for a comeback season in Kelly’s uptempo offense.

The Eagles marched down the field but, deep in Redskins territory, Vick threw a sideways pass that the referees called a lateral, and DeAngelo Hall returned the fumble (actually broken up in the air by Ryan Kerrigan) for a touchdown.

Vick later threw a 25-yard touchdown pass to DeSean Jackson

RGIII just threw an interception. He looked tentative and threw it into double coverage.

Alfred Morris has fumbled twice, and the second one led to a safety. It’s Philly 12, Washington 7.

In my most recent article on Bleacher Report, I predicted that the Redskins will finish 11-5 despite the following startling statistic:

Of the last 10 NFL teams to finish 10-6 after a losing season, only one of them (the 2006 Kansas City Chiefs) followed up their 10-6 year with a winning season.

Click here to read my most recent article about RGIII and the Redskins (http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1767742-robert-griffin-iii-washington-redskins-must-buck-history-to-make-playoffs-again).

Michael Vick is great from the pocket

September 11, 2011

During Philadelphia’s 31-13 win over the St. Louis Rams Sunday, Brian Billick said on Fox that Michael Vick needs to be able to play well from the pocket, implying that he can only succeed on the run.

Vick finished last season with a passer rating of over 100 in the pocket. It’s a complete myth that he can only play on the run.  Vick also got criticism for supposedly not being a quarterback earlier in his career when all he does is win.

Michael Vick getting the credit he deserves, proving critics wrong

November 27, 2010

Former Virginia Tech star Michael Vick has received widespread praise for his play quarterbacking the Philadelphia Eagles, and rightfully so.  After Vick accounted for six touchdowns in a 59-28 road win against the Redskins two weeks ago, many NFL experts called Vick a possible MVP candidate, and some even called him the best player in the NFL.

But many members of the media who have nothing but good things to say about Vick, especially the talking heads on ESPN, are the same people who insisted that Vick would play a different position once he returned to the NFL.

Virtually every analyst at ESPN either said that Vick would not only come back playing a different position, but that he was never a good quarterback in the first place. Chris Mortensen of ESPN was one of many who said Vick might play receiver, defensive back, and return kicks, and do it in the UFL, whatever that is.  It’s funny how none of those “experts” admits he was wrong.  At least one blogger predicted before the 2009 season that Vick would be successful again as a quarterback, though, and gave Vick credit for winning 10 more games than he lost.

The trade last spring that brought former Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb to the Redskins made Washington better, but who would have thought that not only would the Eagles stay playoff bound, but the Vick would be their starter? Vick has become a better player since he has become the starter for Philadelphia, and he has also been helped by Eagles coach Andy Reid and good receivers. But there was a reason Vick was the highest played player in the game before he got busted for dogfighting.  Vick’s ability to throw, run, and throw on the run struck fear into the hearts of defenses.

Ask defenders who they fear more, a quarterback who can hurt them in multiple ways, or an interception machine like Jay Cutler or Brett Favre?  Quarterbacks like Cutler and Favre get overrated, while quarterbacks like Vick have traditionally been underrated (Jemele Hill of ESPN.com has an idea why).

Vick has paid his price and made a great comeback.  But back to the original point: when it comes to football, Vick deserves all the credit he gets.  It’s just staggering, though, how so many so-called experts said that a quarterback who was 10 games over .500 for his career not only couldn’t play anymore, but was never any good in the first place.  It was also strange that these carnival barkers, many of them former players and writers, also said Vick wouldn’t return as a quarterback.

But if you said that Vick couldn’t play quarterback, and even tried to tell everybody that he was never any good in the first place, at least admit you were wrong about his ability two years ago when you talk about how great he is now.

To see my entire article on Examiner.com, click here.

What do you think about Vince Young now, Merril Hoge and ESPN?

December 20, 2009

So Vince Young is now 7-1 this year as a starting QB for the Tennessee Titans.  He replaced Kerry Collins, who was 0-6 as a starter.  Vince Young’s career record as a starter is 25-12.  Oh, by the way, at Texas he won a national championship and was 30-2.  He’s a winner.  Yet after he took over and started winning for the Titans this year, ESPN’s Merril Hoge said that Titans RB Chris Johnson had to do more for his team than any other player in the league.  Well, Johnson was playing when the Titans were 0-6.

A couple of weeks ago Hoge said he was going to “bury the hatchet.” Why the need to bury the hatchet if you didn’t have an axe to grind? Why not just be objective and unbiased?  Why the animosity against Young?  Earlier this year, Ron Jaworski, Trent Dilfer, Tim Hasselbeck, Mark Schlereth, Steve Young and other ESPN commentators talked about how Young was a bad QB and how he could only play outside the pocket.   The disdain they had for him was apparent.  They mocked him.  But eight games is enough of a sample to realize that Young winning isn’t a fluke.

It’s true that Johnson is the best running back in the league, but it’s not as if Young has great receivers.  Nate Washington, Justin Gage, and Kenny Britt aren’t bad, but DBs don’t especially fear them.  Maybe Young has improved his ability to make decisions and work habits. But even before this season he was 18-11.  He’s only in his fourth year, and he hardly played last year.

I think we have to raise the question:  was the media biased against Young because he is black?  Young isn’t the first black quarterback to be mocked by members of the white media.  Michael Vick has a career record of 38-28-1 as a starter, but the criticism about his ability as a QB has been unrelenting.  Take away the dogfighting controversy — that’s a separate issue.  You would think that Vick can’t read a defense by listening to some of the comments about him.  I have a pretty good idea that if a white quarterback was 25-12 or 38-28-1, he’d be getting a lot more praise. The standard is much higher for black quarterbacks.

At the same time, white quarterbacks are allowed to make mistakes. Look at Jay Cutler.  Basically, if you had listened to the media reaction, Cutler was the second coming when he was traded from the Broncos to the Bears. He has a career record of 22-28.  (He did have a winning record in high school, though).  I suggested earlier this year that he be the first player ever to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame while still playing: 2009/11/12/should-jay-cutler-be-immediately-put-in-the-nfl-hall-of-fame/

Interestingly, in that same blog, I talked about the fact that the Cleveland Browns needed to give Joshua Cribbs more playing time including at QB. Cribbs was a QB in college and set all kinds of records at Kent State, but was never given the chance to be a QB in the NFL.  He had two 100-yard kickoff returns for TDs today, and eight for his career — an NFL record.  He also runs for six yards a carry.  He also threw a perfect pass in the end zone that was dropped. I suggested that the Redskins trade for him earlier this year.  Cribbs is clearly one of the 10 best players in the NFL.

Anyway, another possibility of why ESPN hated Young so much was because he had depression earlier in his career.  Hoge and the others may have been discriminating against Young because of this.  They may have equated depression with weakness.  If someone has a concussion you don’t laugh at them for it.

Sorry, Hoge.  Young has won more than twice as many games as he has lost.  But I guess you don’t like winners.