Posts Tagged ‘water’

Flint, Washington, D.C. and toxic lead in water causing brain damage in children

March 6, 2016

The Flint, Michigan lead in water crisis is in the spotlight now at the Democratic debate between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders.

Here are a couple of articles about the lead crisis in water in Washington, D.C. and how the CDC lied to the public, while the D.C. government didn’t help the situation by botching the partial replacement of lead pipes with copper.

Lead causes brain damage and developmental disabilities, and fetuses, infants and developing children are especially affected.

http://www.examiner.com/article/congress-cdc-misled-public-about-washington-d-c-lead-water-crisis-lead-was-toxic-for-some

http://www.examiner.com/article/cdc-15-000-washington-d-c-homes-may-have-dangerous-levels-of-lead-water

Lead, toxic, water, CDC, Washington, EPA, Congress, plumbing, pipes, copper, fetuses, infants, children.

Flint, Michigan lead in water crisis: other articles

January 20, 2016

Flint, Michigan, outside of Detroit, is having a serious crisis about lead in water, which is catastrophically toxic to fetuses, infants, and developing children. It can cause serious brain damage for them – and is merely very unhealthy for everyone else.

Here are a couple of articles about lead in water – about how the Centers for Disease Control lied to the public about lead in water in D.C., and about how even a few years ago there may have been lead in D.C. water.

http://www.examiner.com/article/congress-cdc-misled-public-about-washington-d-c-lead-water-crisis-lead-was-toxic-for-some

http://www.examiner.com/article/cdc-15-000-washington-d-c-homes-may-have-dangerous-levels-of-lead-water

 

CDC says Washington, D.C. homes with partial lead replacements are at risk for high lead in water

December 13, 2010

A December CDC report states that nearly 15,000 Washington, D.C. homes that have had partial lead line replacements are at risk for high lead levels.  See the article here on Examiner.com.

The problem started around 2000 when D.C. responded to a 1998 EPA mandate to reduce chlorine byproducts that could be carcinogenic.  Chlorine was used to disinfect the water supply, but then chloramine was used to reduce chlorine byproducts. However, chloramine caused lead pipes to leach into the water, and much of the city’s infrastructure was made of lead pipes. Lead causes irreversible brain damage to fetuses and infants.  After children tested high for lead from 2003 to 2004, two bad things happened.  First, both the city and the CDC covered up the problem, lying about it, claiming that the water was safe when they knew it wasn’t.  Second, the city embarked on a $100 million project to replace lead service lines with copper, but they stopped when they got to private property.  The chloramine caused lead to leach from the water, causing a temporary spike in lead levels, making the problem worse.

Congress came out with a report last spring that said CDC used false data to mislead the public in a 2004 report.  CDC then admitted wrongdoing, and two weeks ago published a report that stated that nearly 15,000 homes with partial lead line replacements were still at risk for high lead levels.  Those homes should be tested.

I think that’s it, but it’s pretty confusing.  Welcome to the D.C. lead in water fiasco, circa 2000-2010.  Makes the Redskins problems seem not so bad.

Also, here is an article from June about a congressional report that said CDC misled the D.C. public about the safety of drinking water, which had high levels of lead from 2001 to 2004.

Congress: CDC misled public about Washington, D.C. lead in water crisis, lead was toxic for some

June 3, 2010

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recklessly misled the public about the safety of lead levels in the water in Washington, D.C. between 2001 and 2004, according to a disturbing and damning congressional report released last month.

The Report, “A Public Health Tragedy: How Flawed CDC Data and Faulty Assumptions Endangered Children’s Health,” was conducted by the House Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight of the Committee on Science and Technology.

The congressional investigation found that a 2004 CDC report that was rushed to calm the fears of the public after the D.C. lead scare used flawed data to come to the inaccurate conclusion that lead levels in the water were safe. The discredited report, published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), has since been widely quoted by media and government agencies across the nation to tell the public that drinking water containing high levels of lead is not a health hazard.

Environmental health problems often affect poor, minority residents disproportionately. In D.C., lead levels were worst in the city’s poorest neighborhoods, in Southeast and Northeast. See a Washington Post map of lead test results from 2003 to 2004.

More examples of how environmental problems affect disadvantaged people, and how fetuses, infants, and young children are affected most by toxicants is seen in CNN’s series “Toxic America” June 2 and 3 as Sanjay Gupta reports on environmental health hazards.

To see the rest of my article on examiner.com, click here.