Posts Tagged ‘chemicals’

Sirius Satellite Radio Receivers have chemicals “known…to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm.”

March 1, 2014

I have a to do list a mile long but I felt compelled to post this. Sirius Satellite Radio Receivers have a warning on the box that says “This product contains chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm.” That’s pretty startling. First, for people who dismiss this type of information, if a company actually posts a warning such as this, you know it’s serious. Second, what are you supposed to do? Should a woman who is about to get pregnant or already pregnant stay away from it? How far away? What about men? What are the dangerous chemicals?

We need much more, not less, regulation when it comes to safety. A quick google search found that no one seems to be caring or looking into this – all that came up was PDF documents and user guides.

Here’s info on another item. I just bought a “Mabis/DMI Healthcare Body Positioner, White” from Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Mabis%2FDMI%20Healthcare%20Body%20Positioner%2C%20White)

It turns out that this foam wedge, designed to help people sleep on their side, has the following warning:

“We are providing the following warning for products linked to this page:

WARNING: This product contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm.”

About California Proposition 65

California’s Proposition 65 entitles California consumers to special warnings for products that contain chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm if those products expose consumers to such chemicals above certain threshold levels. We care about our customers’ safety and hope that the information below helps with your buying decisions.

Thank God for California, requiring companies to post these warnings, but the warnings are hard to see. You’d think the company, knowing its item contains chemicals that are “known to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm,” would at least sell the item with a cover, but no.

Traffic pollution, air quality linked with increased risk of autism

December 2, 2012

Babies in the womb and during their first year are two to three times more likely to develop autism if exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollution and poor air quality, according to a recent study.

Researchers at the Keck School of Medicine at USC published the study in the November issue of Archives of General Psychiatry. The study compared 279 children with autism and 245 control children with typical development in California.

Metals and chemicals may be part of the toxic stew that affects fetuses and babies, which are more susceptible to toxins in the environment.

To read the entire article on Examiner.com, click here.

 

Environmental autism articles from 2011

January 11, 2012

2011 was another eventful year in autism news. Scientists showed us that environmental toxins play a major role in autism, despite the previously held belief that autism is all genetically based.

Links to the articles are below.

Toxic chemicals found in baby products; some may be linked to autism

Studies: environmental factors during pregnancy may increase risk of autism

Scientists say rise in autism may be linked to toxic chemicals in environment

To see the article on Examiner.com, click here.

Scientists say chemicals are linked to increase in autism, Safe Chemicals Act proposed

June 9, 2011

Decades ago the medical establishment insisted autism resulted in the coldness of the mother.  Obviously that was 180 degrees wrong.

Just a few years ago they insisted autism was almost all genetic.  That was largely wrong because autism is very much environmental.

Now, as autism continues to increase, those in the scientific establishment are finally admitting that environmental causes play a major role.

Some scientists, parents, and advocates have been ahead of the curve for many years, insisting that toxic chemicals and other pollutants are major factors in autism.  Some of those experts spoke Tuesday on a conference call.

Some of the suspected culprits are endocrine disruptors such as brominated flame retardants, pesticides, BPA and phthalates. Mercury and lead are also known neurotoxins.

Many of these chemicals are ubiquitous in household products and even toys, and unfortunately, most people don’t know about it. The law that is supposed to provide protection against dangerous chemicals is 35 years old and has virtually no restrictions on chemicals, which don’t need to be tested before going to market.

To read my article on Examiner.com, about this, click here.

Here are some of my related articles:

Scientists say rise in autism may be linked to toxic chemicals in environment

http://www.examiner.com/dc-in-national/scientists-say-rise-autism-may-be-linked-to-toxic-chemicals-environment

Toxic chemicals found in baby products; some may be linked to autism

http://www.examiner.com/dc-in-national/toxic-chemicals-found-baby-products-some-may-be-linked-to-autism

Toxic Chemicals Safety Act to be on 2011 Congressional legislative agenda

http://www.examiner.com/dc-in-national/toxic-chemicals-safety-act-to-be-on-2011-congressional-legislative-agenda

Health advocates rally at Capitol for chemical safety bill; some chemicals linked to autism, cancer

http://www.examiner.com/dc-in-national/health-advocates-rally-at-capitol-for-chemical-safety-bill-some-chemicals-linked-to-autism-cancer

Landrigan calls for more research into pesticides, toxic chemicals, environmental causes of autism

http://www.examiner.com/dc-in-national/landrigan-calls-for-more-research-into-pesticides-toxic-chemicals-environmental-causes-of-autism

Congress: CDC misled public about Washington, D.C. lead in water crisis, lead was toxic for some

http://www.examiner.com/dc-in-national/congress-cdc-misled-public-about-washington-d-c-lead-water-crisis-lead-was-toxic-for-some

Autism advocate Lyn Redwood discusses mercury vaccine controversy, chelation, treatment and recovery

http://www.examiner.com/dc-in-national/autism-advocate-lyn-redwood-discusses-mercury-vaccine-controversy-chelation-treatment-and-recovery

CDC: 15,000 Washington, D.C. homes may have dangerous levels of lead in water

http://www.examiner.com/dc-in-national/cdc-15-000-washington-d-c-homes-may-have-dangerous-levels-of-lead-water

Interview with Dan Olmsted, Mark Blaxill: ‘Age of Autism-Mercury, Medicine, and a Manmade Epidemic’

http://www.examiner.com/dc-in-national/interview-with-dan-olmsted-mark-blaxill-age-of-autism-mercury-medicine-and-a-manmade-epidemic

Jennifer VanDerHorst-Larson on vaccines, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, treatments for son with autism

http://www.examiner.com/dc-in-national/jennifer-vanderhorst-larson-on-vaccines-hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy-treatments-for-son-with-autism

Toxic chemicals found in baby products; brominated flame retardants may be linked to autism

May 19, 2011

new study shows that 80 percent of products tested made for infants and toddlers contained toxic chemical flame retardants that can have harmful effects on health.  The products include items made with polyurethane foam such as car seats, mattresses, and changing pads.  Of the 80 samples in the study that contained flame retardants, 79 were either brominated or chlorinated.

Brominated flame retardants, or those based in the chemical element bromine, have been implicated as potential risk factors in autism spectrum disorders, cancer, and other health problems. Studies on brominated flame retardants have shown adverse developmental effects on animals.

Brominated flame retardants have increased in household products over the last 30 years because they make them less flammable. However, the toxins from these chemicals can leach from the products into the environment and accumulate in the body.  Fetuses and babies are especially susceptible to toxic chemicals.

To read the rest of my article on Examiner.com, click here.

15 articles from 2010 every parent of a child with an autism spectrum disorder should read

January 15, 2011

One of the major educational and therapeutic trends in autism in 2010 was an increase in meaningful, developmental autism therapies that incorporate social, emotional and cognitive skills to enhance traditional behavioral methods.

On the research front, scientists increasingly recognized and acknowledged that autism is largely environmental and not solely genetic.

And while devastating tragedies occurred, out of those heartbreaks came greater awareness and safety measures that will ultimately save the lives of vulnerable children.

Examiner.com‘s Mike Frandsen takes a look back at some of the articles from 2010 that reflected critical issues in the world of autism.

Mason Alert would help prevent wandering, drowning deaths of kids with autism

Mason Alert to be combined with Take Me Home program to prevent autism wandering

Dr. Stanley Greenspan dies, founded Floortime and developmental approaches to autism therapy

Teaching, coaching sports, playing with children with autism: rewarding, but also a whole lot of fun

Play dates for kids with autism can enhance social skills, emotional awareness, and learning

Using humor, puppets in play therapy can enhance social, communication skills for kids with autism

Understanding and managing emotions are important life and social skills for children with autism

Sports and exercise for children with autism can improve social and cognitive skills

Top 10 mistakes, lessons learned from therapy programs for children with autism spectrum disorders

Landrigan calls for more research into pesticides, toxic chemicals, environmental causes of autism

Autism advocate Lyn Redwood discusses mercury vaccine controversy, chelation, treatment and recovery

Interview with Dan Olmsted, Mark Blaxill: ‘Age of Autism-Mercury, Medicine, and a Manmade Epidemic’

Congress: CDC misled public about Washington, D.C. lead in water crisis, lead was toxic for some

Facilitated Communication (FC) enables non-verbal people on autism spectrum to communicate by typing

HHS, NIH and other federal agencies should hire more employees with autism and other disabilities

For the rest of the article on Examiner.com, click here.

Chemical safety reform expected to be on Congressional legislative to do list in 2011

January 1, 2011

America needs legislation to improve the safety of toxic chemicals, according to a coalition of advocates, scientists and health experts.

Chemicals and other environmental toxins have been implicated in diseases and disorders as varied as autism, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, and asthma.

Two bills were introduced in Congress in 2010 to improve the safety of toxic chemicals and reform the 34-year old Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).  The outdated law only authorizes the Environmental Protection Agency to call for safety testing for chemicals that have already been shown to pose health risks.

The Toxic Chemicals Safety Act in the House and the Safe Chemicals Act in the Senate would not only empower EPA to take steps to minimize risks from chemicals proven to be dangerous, but would also require safety testing of all industrial chemicals, and require businesses to prove chemicals are safe before using them.  Currently, only 200 of the more than 80,000 chemicals in existence have been tested for safety.

Dr. Philip Landrigan of the Mount Sinai Medical Center has said environmental causes are strongly associated with autism.

“Over the last decade, we’ve developed very good scientific information that links three or four classes of chemicals to brain injury in babies if the exposure occurs during pregnancy,” Landrigan told Examiner.com in 2010. “We’ve found that phthalates, brominated flame retardants, and certain pesticides are linked to loss of intelligence, attention deficit disorder, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder in children.”

Dr. Sarah Janssen, a scientist with the Natural Resources Defense Council, told Examiner.com in 2010 that chemicals play a role in autism. “There are concerns that many chemicals in the environment are linked to autism, in particular, heavy metals and pesticides,” Janssen said. “The passage of this (Toxic Chemicals Safety) act would make a major impact not just on autism but all neurodevelopmental disorders in children and adults.”

And at a press conference sponsored by Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families last month, a panel of experts told reporters that toxic chemicals, already linked to autism, cancer and other health problems, have also been linked to an increase in reproductive health ailments such as infertility, early puberty, decreased sperm counts, breast cancer and prostate cancer.

Tracey Woodruff, a scientist with the Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment at the University of California, San Francisco, told reporters that chemicals such as phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA), which are pervasive in many plastic products, can interfere with reproductive health and normal hormone function.

When asked about the role of chemicals and other environmental toxicants in autism, Woodruff told Examiner.com that the developing brain is especially vulnerable to certain chemical substances.

“Chemical prenatal exposures can adversely affect the developing brain in some way whether affecting behavioral or cognitive function,” Woodruff said.

“Mercury is an identified neurodevelopmental toxicant, meaning that a number of studies show that exposures that occur prenatally can adversely impact neurodevelopment. Phthalates have been implicated in affecting brain development in terms of how the children behave when they’re older.”

To see the rest of my article on Examiner.com, click here.

 

Health advocates rally at Capitol for chemical safety bill; some chemicals linked to autism, cancer

July 31, 2010

Andy Igrejas, Brenda Afzal, and Dr. Sarah Janssen speak in favor of the Toxic Chemicals Safety Act. Photo by Mike Frandsen

Environmental advocates rallied in Washington, D.C. Thursday to support legislation to protect the public from toxic chemicals that have been linked to disorders and diseases such as autism and cancer.

Representatives from the Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families Coalition and Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) held a press conference in front of the Capitol Reflecting Pool, urging Congress to overhaul a 1976 law that does not require all chemicals to be tested for safety.

The press conference took place alongside a giant inflatable rubber duck to symbolize that even simple items such as toys may contain unsafe chemicals.

Dr. Sarah Janssen, a scientist with NRDC, said most people have a story of someone who has been affected by unsafe chemicals: “People who have had cancer, problems conceiving a child, children with learning or developmental problems, asthma, and parents or grandparents struggling with diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s — all of these chronic illnesses have been associated to some extent with exposures to toxic chemicals.”

For the rest of my article on Examiner.com, click here.

Landrigan calls for more research into pesticides, toxic chemicals, environmental causes of autism

July 19, 2010

Dr. Philip Landrigan of the Mount Sinai Medical Center told the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC) Friday that more research needs to be conducted on potential environmental causes of autism.

Dr. Philip Landrigan told the IACC Friday more research needs to be done into the environmental causes of autism. Photo by Mike Frandsen.

For decades, autism has been believed to be primarily a genetic disorder, but in recent years, scientists have acknowledged that environmental factors such as pesticides and other chemicals also play a significant role in the causes of autism.

Landrigan is one of the leaders of the National Children’s Study, which is expected to identify causes of autism and many other childhood disorders and diseases. The study will “examine the effects of environmental influences on the health and development of 100,000 children across the United States, following them from before birth until age 21.”

Landrigan has been investigating the effects of environmental toxicants on the development of children since the early 1970s when he determined that even very small levels of lead could affect cognitive ability.

His landmark work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) resulted in the government banning lead from gasoline in 1976 and from paint in 1977, actions that decreased childhood lead poisoning in the U.S. by more than 90 percent.

To see the rest of my article on Examiner.com, click here.


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